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What acidic level and the erosion of

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What liquid cleans coins the fastestAlexander CuadrosExperimental InvestigationTable of ContentsPage 1:Title pagePage 2: Table of contents Page 3: AcknowledgementsPage 4: Purpose and hypothesisPage 5: Background researchPage 6: Materials and ProcedurePage 7-8:ResultsPage 9-10: Conclusion, Reflection, and applicationPage 11: Reference listAcknowledgementsI acknowledge my parents for providing me the materials that I need for my experiment. This would not be possible without them.Purpose What liquid cleans pennies the best and why? This project’s purpose is to find the relationship (if any) between acidic level and the erosion of copper.Hypothesis I believe that out of my chosen liquids, Coke will clean it’s penny the best. I believe this because I think that the acid in coke and it’s carbonation will cause the grime to erode quicker.ResearchHave you ever wondered how to clean old coins?My testable question was; which liquids clean pennies the best and why? My goal is to find why certain liquids can clean pennies better than others. My hypothesis is that coke will clean pennies the best because of it’s high level of acidity. I believe that the other liquids will vary due to the acidic levels and that water will clean it the worst.I started my research by finding out common ways to clean coins. I found out that more serious coin collectors use the cleaning method that is least harmful to the coins worth while more practical people use liquids such as vinegar. I wanted to know why vinegar could make coins so shiny, and I found out that the vinegar caused the copper oxide to dissolve. I wanted to find out if other practical liquids could clean coins just as well. I then researched liquids that could also clean coins to some degree, then I came up with my procedure. After I completed my procedure, I wanted to see how my results could be applied to the real world, after researching the topic I found out about what the main uses of copper are, and if they are ever affected by acidic liquids in the real world.Materials5 cupsSource of waterSource of club sodaSource of Coca ColaSource of lemon juiceSource of soap5 dirty penniesProcedure Step 1: Gather liquids and cupsStep 2: Gather penniesStep 3:Pour liquids into cupsStep 4: Put pennies into liquid filled cups (1 eachLet pennies sit in liquids for  1 hour and record pH levels every 10 minutesRecord results ex: luster and take pictures Put result into a chart or tableResultsAfter completing my procedure and recording my data I found that my hypothesis was incorrect. Lemon juice, actually had the highest acidity level, not Coke, and it cleaned the coins the best. Coke actually made the penny more dirty, which surprised me. Another interesting thing that I recorded was the acidity of the lemon juice going down. I believe that it may have something to do with it deoxidizing the penny so well.Liquidlevel of acidity pH cleanness water (control)                       7Slightly dirtierSoapy water8Slightly dirtierlemon juice1cleanerClub soda7Slightly cleanerCoke5dirtierLiquidLevel of pH before testLevel of pH after testWater (control)77Soapy water87Lemon juice13Club soda77Coke55Liquid10 min20 min30 min40 min50 min60 minWater (Control)777777Soapy Water777777Lemon Juice243333Club soda777777Coke555555Conclusion Lemon juice cleaned it’s penny the best, my hypothesis was incorrect and ended up being the opposite, as the coke penny because more dirty. Lemon juice also had the highest acidic level  of all of the liquids that I tested. I believe that this proves that there is a correlation between acid levels and the corrosion of metals, or at least copper.      ReflectionI think that this project will be a challenge for me because there is many components of it that can possibly expanded on. It can help me learn about something I am interested in cleaning various coins that I can collect. It can also show if acid can deoxidize metals, in this case mainly the zinc in pennies. I started my research by finding out common ways to clean coins. I found out that more serious coin collectors use the cleaning method that is least harmful to the coins worth while more practical people use liquids such as vinegar. I wanted to know why vinegar could make coins so shiny, and I found out that the vinegar caused the copper oxide to dissolve. I wanted to find out if other practical liquids could clean coins just as well. I then researched liquids that could also clean coins to some degree, then I came up with my procedure. After I completed my procedure, I wanted to research how I could apply my experiment to the real world. I found out that pollution, specifically sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides omitted in the air, mainly caused by the burning of fossil fuels. These compounds then mix with rain, snow, ect to increase the acidic levels of the precipitation, creating “acid rain.” I now wonder if copper buildings can possibly, on a small scale, can be slowly eroded by acid rain as pollution gets worse.ApplicationIf someone wants to clean their coins they should know what is the best way to clean that coin. My experiment could possibly show the relationship between acidic levels and cleaning coins. It can also be a quick and safe way to clean all metals that oxidize. This can also be used in larger scales for different materials, and can prove a cheaper, more efficient way to clean metals faster. Copper is used in many buildings, such as the statue of liberty, and can be corroded by liquids when they have a high enough acidic level. This could lead to the erosion of buildings that use copper as a building material by acid rain, which is caused by the increase of the acidic level of rain due to pollution. This can be modeled on a very small scale in my experiment.Reference ListWu, Kris, and Tara Redfield. “Food Hacks Daily.” WonderHowTo, food-hacks.wonderhowto.com/.”How to Handle & Clean Your Coins.” How to Clean Coins & Handle Old, Rare Coins, www.numismaster.com/ta/inside_numis.jsp?page=how-to-handle-clean-coins.”Science Activity: Turn Old Pennies Bright and Shiny! | Exploratorium.” Exploratorium: the Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception, www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/copper_caper.html.”What Is Lemon Juice Made Of?” Lemon-Info.com, www.lemon-info.com/2009/04/18/what-is-lemon-juice-made-of/.”Science Activity: Turn Old Pennies Bright and Shiny! | Exploratorium.” Exploratorium: the Museum of Science, Art and Human Perception, www.exploratorium.edu/science_explorer/copper_caper.html.

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